ICT & Teaching (447 items)To section archive

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With a plethora of technology available to support teaching and learning, preservice teachers are expected to become well-versed in technology literacy and competencies through their teacher education programs. This study examined preservice teachers’ perceptions of technology competencies, based on newly issued International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards for Educators. A mixed-methods design was used to collect data at one of the national universities of education in South Korea. The preservice teachers viewed their current technology education courses as deficient: neither tailored to their technology competency levels, nor strategically aligned with each other. This study suggested that teacher education curricula should be redesigned to offer more and better opportunities for teachers to improve teaching technology skills that can be readily applied to classrooms.
Published: 2021
Updated: Jun. 07, 2021
Multiliteracies is not only concerned with learners’ meaning-making using multiple communication and representation channels but with individuals’ contributions towards a collaborative and participatory culture. However, understanding collective knowledge construction in computer-mediated discussions is challenging due to large and complex digital texts in online contexts. To respond to this challenge, this study investigated the relationships between network structures and potentials for collaborative knowledge construction in a 12-week online multiliteracies professional education course by adopting Knowledge Society Network and Collaborative Knowledge Networks as analytical frameworks and using Social Network Analysis to find which network models the online course followed. Consequently, the network of teacher participants’ interactions showed high participant interaction and low idea interaction.
Published: 2021
Updated: May. 18, 2021
The study presents survey results from 515 preservice teachers at a regional United States institution on their social media use, specifically, their self-reported personal image conveyed on their social media sites, likelihood of posting problematic content on their social media sites, and preference for various others viewing their social media sites. While many preservice teachers reported appropriate social media use, some participants conveyed inappropriate personal images; had reservations about supervisors, employers, and university faculty viewing their sites; and were likely to post problematic content. Thus, it is incumbent for teacher preparation programs to develop clear policies as preservice teachers must be made aware of the professional consequences of inappropriate social media usage and behaviours.
Published: 2020
Updated: Feb. 17, 2021
The study’s purpose was to investigate whether two different pedagogical strategies, flipped classroom and flipped team-based learning (FTBL), had different impacts on preservice teachers’ TPACK, attitudes, self-efficacy, and perceptions of teamwork. Several survey instruments were sent to 32 preservice teachers who were Middle Grades Education majors at the beginning and end of the spring 2019 semester. Descriptive analyses, paired-samples t-tests, independent sample t-tests, and Pearson’s correlation tests were run. The overall results showed that preservice teachers who enrolled in the FTBL section reported higher scores in most constructs. However, most comparisons had no statistically significant differences. The results may help teacher educators to rethink the pedagogical strategies used in the stand-alone educational technology course and provide alternatives to the traditional teaching approach.
Published: 2020
Updated: Feb. 17, 2021