Programs & Practicum (321 items)To section archive

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A comparison of population and employment projections shows the gap between teacher supply and demand growing through 2025. Alternative certification programs (ACPs) were created to increase teacher production, but research on who selects ACPs versus traditional preparation programs (TPPs) shows mixed results as does research on new teacher attrition. Analyzing employment and preparation data for over 225,000 new teachers (56% ACP), the authors found male and teachers of color were more likely to be ACP prepared. Using survival analysis, they found TPP teachers were significantly more likely to remain in the classroom than ACP teachers. They also found that teachers of color were more likely to stay teaching after accounting for preparation differences, and Latinx teachers from traditional preparation programs were most likely to stay teaching.
Published: 2020
Updated: Apr. 17, 2021
This study focuses on pre-service training. Three groups of student teachers were created: one group received conceptual training only, another received conceptual training and the opportunity to co-teach, and a third group received initial conceptual training and explanations on its use from a member of the second group. An explicative sequential mixed design was chosen, which combines a quantitative study, conducted on a pre-post basis to compare test results on attitude and willingness to use co-teaching, with a qualitative study to analyse co-teaching student-teachers’ perceptions in both their own learning experience and the learning experience of the pupils. The results show that those who received only conceptual training modified their attitudes to a lesser degree and curiously, those in the group receiving explanations from a peer improved the most.
Published: 2020
Updated: Apr. 17, 2021
The shutdown of universities and schools in England, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, came just as many pre-service students began their final practicum. This research focuses on the challenges this posed for teacher educators. Using qualitative research methods and concepts from spatial geography, the article explores how pedagogies adapted as the removal of the practicum relocated learning communities to new online spaces. Established practices changed quickly, with educators showing ‘pedagogic agility’. Despite the relocation to newly-formed online spaces, many principles and ‘intentionalities’ of practice remained unchanged, as did the teacher educators’ orientating values. Overall, there was a sense of both sameness and difference in some of the innovative pedagogies developed on the (g)local level. This research has international relevance in considering the spaces in which authentic teacher education can occur and the alternative pedagogies and technologies to support professional learning in the case of a ‘missing’ practicum.
Published: 2020
Updated: Apr. 12, 2021
Collaboration is a key component of our practice as teachers and teacher educators and there is a need to develop generative models for collaboration among teacher educators. The authors have created and tested a model of collaboration. The model includes a collaborative overarching research project and, nested under this mantle, a series of focused research projects conducted by pairs of collaborators, international networking, and enactments of scholarship. A key element of the success of this model was the foundation of this research in arts-based inquiry. The model has enabled rapid and rich development of academic collaboration with flexibility to develop new practices and projects that benefits research and teaching.
Published: 2020
Updated: Apr. 07, 2021