Teacher Educators (230 items)To section archive

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This article describes a U.S. based multi-year study focused on understanding how a critical reflective practice informs the identities and practices of two teacher educators and a group of preservice teachers. Using a self-study methodology, the authors have examined the processes and practices of their own identity development, alongside that of their preservice teachers. Using a framework as a tool for reflection, they posited a series of questions as a prompt for collaborative reflective writing. In their analysis of these written reflections, they discovered a process of becoming more reflective and expansive through writing, explicitly identifying the contextual factors at play in their personal development as educators. In addition, they found that this method of self-study became a space for transformational learning, where educators could share, be vulnerable, take risks but also care for one another in the process. The findings from this study highlight the importance of careful, critical reflection when supporting new educators.
Published: 2021
Updated: Jul. 20, 2021
The purpose of this self-study was to examine an internal conflict the lead author was feeling about her credibility to teach pre-service elementary teachers when she was similar in age to them and had no K-12 teaching experience.  Having taught only as an undergraduate science teaching assistant, she was now assigned in her doctoral program to be an early field experience instructor for elementary education majors.  Using Relational Cultural Theory  and the framework of deliberate relationship, the role of rapport was analyzed in relation to authority and credibility. Findings show the lead author’s rapport with her pre-service teachers was valuable in supporting her authority and credibility as an instructor, but only when boundaries to rapport were maintained. Specifically, findings show the difficulty in balancing caring for pre-service teachers with appropriate boundaries, and need for diligent transparency of practice.  Implications for successful teacher-student relationships when feeling tensions between developing rapport and authority are discussed.  Positive, mutually-beneficial relationships with high rapport are possible as long as the instructor maintains appropriate boundaries with pre-service teachers by focusing on the teacher-student relationship rather than attempting to establish friendships.
Published: 2020
Updated: Jul. 01, 2021
This study made explicit the discourses of 10 teachers working as university-based teacher educators in Singapore to understand their enacted identities. It framed identity as discursive, constructed through language and talk. Interview data were analyzed using descriptive discourse analysis tools, with critical discourse analysis influencing the process. The discourses are as follows: (a) The value of seconded teachers is located firmly within schools, with practice and practitioner elevated above theory and academics; (b) teaching is the core role of seconded teachers, and discourses about learning, development, and research are weak; and (c) an individualistic framing situates the locus of change on teacher-practitioners. Hybrid spaces that bring theory and practice together are discursive spaces. Both the strengths and limitations of existing discursive identities need to be acknowledged, and multifaceted and complex practitioner identities explored. This article contributes to the integration of practitioners into the wider community of teacher educators in the university.
Published: 2021
Updated: Jul. 01, 2021
This case study interpreted the experiences of a teacher as she grew her coaching and mentoring practices by working with preservice teachers and participating in professional development focused on reflective coaching, mentorship, and literacy teaching. The authors drew on the notion of “becoming” from critical and sociocultural theories in analyzing how she constructed a teaching identity through mentoring, and how her identity enabled her to enact reflective coaching practices. Their findings outline her agentic moves to provide the preservice teacher with reflective support, rather than evaluative critique, in opposition to the surveillance and regulation that characterize many existing teacher evaluation models.
Published: 2020
Updated: Jun. 16, 2021