ICT & Teaching (445 items)To section archive

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The study presents survey results from 515 preservice teachers at a regional United States institution on their social media use, specifically, their self-reported personal image conveyed on their social media sites, likelihood of posting problematic content on their social media sites, and preference for various others viewing their social media sites. While many preservice teachers reported appropriate social media use, some participants conveyed inappropriate personal images; had reservations about supervisors, employers, and university faculty viewing their sites; and were likely to post problematic content. Thus, it is incumbent for teacher preparation programs to develop clear policies as preservice teachers must be made aware of the professional consequences of inappropriate social media usage and behaviours.
Published: 2020
Updated: Feb. 17, 2021
The study’s purpose was to investigate whether two different pedagogical strategies, flipped classroom and flipped team-based learning (FTBL), had different impacts on preservice teachers’ TPACK, attitudes, self-efficacy, and perceptions of teamwork. Several survey instruments were sent to 32 preservice teachers who were Middle Grades Education majors at the beginning and end of the spring 2019 semester. Descriptive analyses, paired-samples t-tests, independent sample t-tests, and Pearson’s correlation tests were run. The overall results showed that preservice teachers who enrolled in the FTBL section reported higher scores in most constructs. However, most comparisons had no statistically significant differences. The results may help teacher educators to rethink the pedagogical strategies used in the stand-alone educational technology course and provide alternatives to the traditional teaching approach.
Published: 2020
Updated: Feb. 17, 2021
This paper paints a complex portrait of the “wicked problem” of teaching technology integration in a field-based content literacy course in order to analyze how a teacher educator demonstrated a presence (and absence) of Teacher Educator Technology Competencies (TETCs). The study indicates that developing technology competencies in teacher educators shares challenges with broader issues of practice based teacher education. It suggests the TETCs would benefit from a clear grounding in theory and should consider the influence of teacher educator Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) on teacher educators’ abilities to build and demonstrate competency. Overall, framing teacher educator professional growth and development through the lens of the TETCs facilitated reflection and spotlighted areas of strength, as well as areas for improvement, within practice.
Published: 2020
Updated: Feb. 17, 2021
This study measured the current technology-competency levels of 242 special and general education teacher-candidates in teacher preparation programs through a self-assessment survey that was developed based on the ISTE Educator Standards. The results show that teacher-candidates perceive that they have not yet reached a proficient level of technology-competency according to ISTE standards. Special education teacher-candidates with team-teaching experience reported a significantly higher level of technology-competency than any other groups. This paper provides insightful recommendations to teacher preparation institutes as to how they can reform their credential program curricula to support teacher-candidates in acquiring the technology competencies they need in the field of education.
Published: 2020
Updated: Feb. 03, 2021