Programs & Practicum (358 items)To section archive

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Although literature emphasizes the value of recursive reflection on problems of practice to facilitate teacher learning and change, few studies investigate teachers’ iterative, evolving reflections on problems that emerge in their efforts to change their practice over time. This case study provides an in-depth, longitudinal analysis of one teacher’s incremental trajectory of change through examining her reflective discourse in pre- and post-observational planning and debriefing meetings with researchers over two-and-a-half school years. The middle school teacher was intentionally focused on changing her practice to support students’ historical inquiry, shifting from a more traditional, authoritative approach to a disciplinary-inquiry stance. Analysis entailed mapping the teacher’s talk about problems of practice in planning/debriefing meetings and how the evolution of her framing of problems was influenced by reflective courses of action. Analysis revealed the teacher’s courses of action differed depending on the type of problem she addressed and that these courses of action contributed to changes in her knowledge, practice, and dispositions. The paper addresses implications for studying and supporting teacher learning and change.
Published: 2021
Updated: May. 14, 2022
This study explores the processes of collaborative teacher learning in a Lesson Study group at a lower secondary school in Norway. In this context, teacher learning is understood from a sociocultural perspective, as making sense of the world, solving problems and exploring new perspectives through social interaction. Audio-recorded teacher discussions are analysed, using a coding system adapted to identify whether teachers’ reports of observations from the classroom are related to interpretation, evaluation and further planning. Findings reveal a strong link between reported and interpreted observations, evaluation of student learning and teaching, and further planning. The article suggests that the sharing phase of the post-research lesson discussions provided the foundation for this relationship. Planned observations operationalised through observation forms contributed to rich reports of observations from several observers. The collaborative sharing process opened up for extended perspectives on the research lessons. However, the most crucial aspect for teacher learning was shared ownership of challenges and a common wish to change and improve the next lesson. These findings contribute to enlighten the potential of teacher learning processes in Lesson Study.
Published: 2022
Updated: May. 09, 2022
The aim of this paper is to critically examine the concept of partnership between school and university. The authors offer a critique of partnership as it is presented in literature at a macro and meso level, and they report on a collaborative enquiry between school and university staff in a (micro-level) secondary school setting. The project was structured around a series of workshops in the school setting to support and facilitate Learning Rounds. Using data from this project including field notes and semi-structured interviews, they will give voice to the often unheard testimony of the teacher in their lived experiences of partnership, and make a contribution to the ongoing debate around partnerships by highlighting some of the difficulties and tensions arising from partnership in practice.
Published: 2022
Updated: May. 09, 2022
The authors’ self-study examines their integration of concepts from the field of Disability Studies in Education (DSE) into their introductory special education and educational foundations courses in two different accredited teacher preparation programs. Using narratives and shared dialogues about their curricular deliberations, they explored the barriers and possibilities of bringing critical visions of disability into the dominant teacher education curriculum. While barriers such as their positioning as contingent faculty and graduate students hindered their adaptation of the “official” curriculum of their programs, they found that such changes afforded important possibilities for justice-oriented teacher preparation. They discuss their realization of DSE as the “null curriculum” in their programs and the need to break away from the curricular status quo in their courses. Their conclusions explore how the integration of DSE informed concepts generated unique opportunities for exploring social justice concepts with the next generation of teachers.
Published: 2021
Updated: Apr. 25, 2022