Trends in Teacher Education (292 items)To section archive

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This article describes OECD ideological and policy changes that form the background for PISA. Furthermore, the author focuses on the OECD’s governance mechanisms and the obstacles it presents to public scrutiny. The author argues that the pursuit of market mechanisms posed both educational and political problems on the OECD's accountability regime. He argues that in order to redress the asymmetries between strong influence and weak democratic control will require profound advances in the organization of the global public sphere. He proposes to broaden the global educational discourse, in which the accountability narrative is complemented by narratives of local institutional learning, educational tradition, democratic participation, and cultural diversity.
Published: 2014
Updated: Oct. 18, 2017
The present paper explores the growing role of venture philanthropy. It also investigates the ideas of educational entrepreneurship and disruptive innovation in influencing the federal and state policies and practices in teacher education in the United States. The authors reject the position that the USA government should invest in the current system of teacher education in order to increase the capacity of the existing institutions that currently prepare teachers. They also disagree with the position that the current teacher education system should be replaced by an alternative based on deregulation and privatization. They suggest the need for transformation in the present system of teacher education, which will improve the quality of teacher education programs. They suggest focusing on helping student teachers learn to enact teaching practices that will promote student learning.
Published: 2015
Updated: Oct. 15, 2017
This paper highlights two key problems of practice the author faced as the instructor of an elementary literacy methods class for Teach for America corps members in a large, northeastern city during an era characterized by strict state and district control: the deficit perspectives the corps members held of their students and the lack of autonomy they experienced as educators. The author concludes by discussing the implications of this work with particular attention to (1) how various institutions frame teaching and learning, (2) the role of methods courses in interrupting these frames, and (3) the pedagogical possibilities inherent in doing so for both students and teachers.
Published: 2016
Updated: Aug. 13, 2017
In this paper, the author argues that a holistic and interdependent view of these aspects is needed. Thus, this paper aims to explore the process of teacher learning from a holistic perspective. Through deliberative discussions and selection, 13 ‘good’ teachers were interviewed in this study. The findings indicate that there may be a two-stage pattern (the II-VA model) that describes two different sorts of teachers. The first sort refers to those teachers who developed strong identities before beginning their teaching service and who tended to have a clearer educational vision which had a direct impact on their practices and professional development. As for the second sort, the teachers’ identities were vague in their first years of teaching, but their professional identities gradually developed within the referential community with affective and professional functions.
Published: 2016
Updated: Aug. 09, 2017