Teacher Educators (218 items)To section archive

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The purpose of the study was to investigate school-based teacher educators’ teaching and supervising goals and to identify how teachers in the role of supervisors perceived university expectations. Thematic analysis indicated that teachers have difficulty establishing goals for themselves as teachers and supervisors. Their teaching goals proceeded from curricula and focused on their pupils’ cognitive development, whilst their perceptions about supporting pupils’ social development were vague. Teachers were unaware of what exactly universities expected of them as supervisors, and believed that providing teaching models for student teachers as a main supervisory goal. It is necessary to offer options to encourage cooperation between teachers and universities and maintain supervisors’ professional development.
Published: 2019
Updated: Aug. 09, 2020
Professional development of teacher educators has not been researched very much in Finland, although interest in teacher educators has started to increase globally in recent decades. This study investigates 15 Finnish teacher educators’ views on their professional development. The results indicate that research plays a significant role in the Finnish teacher educators’ conceptions. They considered research to be an integral part of their work, as it is part of their assigned tasks. This differs from many countries, where researching and high-quality scientific contribution is not necessarily a big part of teacher educators’ work. These teacher educators also viewed research as a means to develop professionally, both through producing and consuming research. Formal professional development, such as professional development courses, did not play a significant role for these teacher educators, though studying either by reading research or participating in free-time education seemed to be more important. The results also indicate that Finnish teacher educators are under pressure to produce high-quality research and to advance in their careers. This is due to business ideology in leadership, i.e. management by results in the Finnish university sector.
Published: 2020
Updated: Jul. 29, 2020
There is limited research investigating models of partnering between University and Schools in initial teacher education (ITE). This project investigated, over a 10 year period, how student teachers in an English University on a one year course, draw on theoretical models, introduced in university sessions, when planning for a ‘creative week’ placement in schools. Working within an interpretivist paradigm drawing on data from 52 student teachers, 10 teachers and 50 children this case study explored a model of teacher education provision. Findings illuminated factors that inhibited student teachers from planning engaging lessons, which challenged their learners, including poor relationships between stakeholders, misunderstandings of the purpose of the placement and under developed knowledge and understandings of how to successfully draw on theoretical models to enhance learning, together with the challenges of limited time during a one year course. Findings also uncovered the extent to which student teachers were ‘allowed’ by some teachers, but not by others, to take risks in their practice, and the impact this has on student teachers’ sense of autonomy and confidence. Implications of the research demonstrate how findings can impact on ITE course design and partnering models between University and schools.
Published: 2020
Updated: Jul. 28, 2020
The purpose of this study is to describe the professional development needs and activities of 61 teacher educators across six national jurisdictions (England, Ireland, Israel, Norway, Scotland and The Netherlands) and to reveal influencing factors and affordances conducive to professional development. Semi-structured interviews constituted questions on professional learning opportunities and teacher education and research. Results from the interviews convey themes around the areas of (i) self-initiated professional development, (ii) the importance of experiencing professional development through collaboration with peers and colleagues, (iii) accessing opportunities to improve teacher education teaching practices, and (iv) the inextricable link between teaching and research and, consequently, the need to upskill in research skills. Discussion points that arise include the induction period, frustration and tension in navigation, haphazard professional learning and learning with, and from, each other.
Published: 2019
Updated: Jul. 28, 2020