Teacher Educators (213 items)To section archive

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Grounded in the Self-Determination Theory, this study examines the relations between teacher educators’ experienced work pressure and opportunities for professional growth, their work related basic needs satisfaction (i.e. autonomy, competence and relatedness) and their researcherly disposition (i.e. being a smart consumer of research, being able to conduct research, conducting research and valuing research). A large-scale survey study was conducted, involving 944 teacher educators working within teaching-intensive teacher education institutions. The results of structural equation modelling (SEM)-analyses show that teacher educators’ opportunities for growth as well as the experienced work pressure are significantly related to the satisfaction of teacher educators’ basic psychological needs at work. In turn, positive relations were identified between the satisfaction of the basic psychological needs and teacher educators’ researcherly disposition.
Published: 2019
Updated: Apr. 26, 2020
If teacher education is to be taken seriously, it must be research-based with teacher educators as active researchers and perceived as ‘public intellectuals’. This re-positioning of teacher education to be ‘research driven’ comes with pressure on teacher educators to focus on securing research funding and increase publication output. This expectation for research productivity competes with increasing calls for more relevant and imaginative teacher preparation programmes. To present the challenging contexts in which Irish teacher educators operate with respect to fulfilling both a teaching and research remit, this paper maps the changing higher education landscape, the regulation of teacher education along with a myriad of curricular reforms at primary and post-primary level. The paper then explores current teacher educators’ positioning in the Irish context as active users and producers of research through in-depth interviews with ten experienced teacher educators.
Published: 2019
Updated: Apr. 23, 2020
Dear Reader, These days we are wondering how you and your colleagues are coping, with the global Covid-19 pandemic having a growing effect on our profession each day. We keep seeking for ways to help the professional community of teacher educators around the world, through and with The International Portal of Teacher Education. To this end, we would greatly appreciate if you could write us your thoughts, suggestions, requests - and we promise to consider and discuss all of them. We would also love to learn about the use you make and the experience you have with this Portal - during regular times and especially during this challenging global Corona crisis. You can contact us simply by replying to portal.eng@macam.ac.il Thank you and best wishes, Dr. Sara Ziv, Head of MOFET's International Department​ Penny Barsimantov, Coordinator of MOFET's International Portals
Published: 2020
Updated: Apr. 23, 2020
Teacher educators have three main paths for career development: teaching, research and institutional leadership. These may be mutually supportive, but also, sources of tension. Recent national and institutional policies encourage teacher educators to increase their research activities. This study aims to describe Israeli teacher educators’ perceptions of the three paths, and their interrelationships, as influenced by their work contexts. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 experienced, research-orientated teacher educators who work in various teacher education colleges in Israel. The results indicate that although research promotes their teaching and institutional leadership, they struggle to strike a balance between the three paths. Colleges do not provide support for career planning, and view teacher educators’ professional development as personal rather than as a collective institutional endeavour.
Published: 2019
Updated: Apr. 22, 2020