Multiculturalism & Diversity (204 items)To section archive

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This study examines what types of emotional work are entailed in approaching multicultural education from a pedagogy and an ethnic of discomfort. The findings reveal a typology of the kinds of emotional work that the authors engage in as teacher educators practicing a pedagogy and ethic of discomfort in multicultural teacher education. The first type of emotional work is managing personal emotional reactions. The second type of emotional work is facing your past in your present practice. The third type of emotional work is remaining vulnerable and emotionally available for students.
Published: 2015
Updated: Feb. 11, 2018
This article describes a self-study partnership between the authors, Tom and Deb, two teacher educators from different institutions. The partnership between the authors began with discussions about shared interests and shared dilemmas in teaching multicultural education content at their respective universities. Over a 2-year period of time, they began to look closely at Tom’s experiences integrating mindfulness into his instruction, which resulted in self-study research. The authors have found that this study reveals the power of theoretically grounding teaching practice in mindfulness and in intentional consideration of language as a tool to establish an appropriate affective space for learning, even in an online setting.
Published: 2015
Updated: Feb. 11, 2018
This study explores trainers’ approaches to organisation and delivery; levels of confidence in delivery; and wider views on the place of spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) in primary schools and in initial teacher training (ITT). The authors conclude that this survey has provided new evidence about the practices and challenges facing those who are training primary teachers in universities and in School-Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT). The authors argue that the promotion of strands relating to children’s personal, social and emotional well-being is essential if children are to fully flourish as human beings.
Published: 2015
Updated: Feb. 11, 2018
This article investigates how preservice teachers developed a relationships with country. The author has described preservice teachers who participated in an elective subject Engaging Koori Kids and their Families. The goal of this elective subject was to motivate preservice teachers to experience a journey of Aboriginal ways of knowing, learning and behaving. The findings reveal that the elective subject demonstrated how teachers could implement and contribute to a holistic localised Aboriginal perspective originating from Country. The goal of this study is that preservice teachers take their story learnt from Country and implement it into the classroom. Each preservice teacher then has the experience to work with a range of Aboriginal community members.
Published: 2016
Updated: Nov. 21, 2017